Oysters and Skyscrapers

We’ve been having some gorgeous weather these past few days, so I decided to take advantage and have a NYC bucket list kind of afternoon.  Since it opened in 2009, I have been wanting to go and see the High Line .  The High Line is a public park built on a 1.45 mile stretch of elevated railroad that runs from Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District to West 34th street on the far west side of Manhattan.

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The beginning of the High Line. This little bit of the Meatpacking District is pretty much all that’s left of the industrial neighborhood which had at one time been home to over 250 slaughterhouses and packing plants — the slaughterhouses having long been replaced by the likes of Diane von Furstenberg and the Apple Store.

The Meatpacking District used to be one of my favorite haunts back in my single days. The area is full of sexy restaurants, bars and nightclubs. It’s a perfect place for a girl’s night out or a third date (insert lascivious eyebrow wiggle here).

My restaurant of choice when in this area has always been Pastis, a french-style bistro with a killer steak frites and a beautiful interior space full of vintage tiles, bronze and crystal lighting fixtures and worn wood cafe tables. Huge french doors lead to a narrow umbrellad outside seating area — perfect for people watching over oysters and rose.

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A little salty, briny bit of heaven on earth.

 

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Frisbee-sized Croque Monsieur. Oh how I loves me some béchamel.

 

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Frites are a must when dining here. With mayonnaise for dipping, of course.

 

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Perfectly ripe berries with the lightest whipped cream I’ve ever had.

 

Sated, and just a little bit tipsy, it was time to hike the stairs to the High Line and see what the fuss was all about.

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The original High Line was built in the 1930s as a way to get dangerous freight trains off busy city streets. For almost fifty years these rails, suspended 30 feet above Manhattan, carried rail cars full of meat, milk, produce and other goods to factories and distribution centers.

 

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The park supports more than 210 plant species. Most are native to New York. For a list of what is due to bloom this fall see here.

 

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“Vintage Wine” cornflowers.

 

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Sally Holmes Roses.

 

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I dunno what this is. Do you?

 

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Stop and take in the cooling breeze off the water.

 

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My favorite building on the West Side.

 

Where Annie met Sam. (Bonus points if you can name the film.)

Where Annie met Sam. (Bonus points if you can name the film.)

 

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You can grab a coffee or enjoy a leisurely lunch from a list of artisanal food shops such as Blue Bottle Coffee and Terroir at The Porch.

 

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Art installations are tucked in among the greenery, displayed on surrounding billboards and on sides of bordering buildings.

 

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Stop often and take a moment to marvel at this amazing city.

 

I’m so glad I finally did this. It’s such a neat way to see this western most part of the island. Who in a millions years would have thought to do this? New Yorkers, that’s who.

Visit this weekend. The weather will be perfect.

xo



Categories: NYC & Travel, Yummy

Tags: , , , , ,

5 replies

  1. Reblogged this on trendbytes and commented:
    See the brick building that says “Moran’s”? That was the building I lived in when I first moved to NYC, on the corner of 10th Avenue and 19th. Back then it was gritty. Now it is in the uber-trendy meatpacking district…ah, memories! And I have eaten at Pastis many times, so this was a total reblog must for me!

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